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Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) are community volunteers, just like you, who stand up and speak out to help children and youth in foster care.

Our CASA program belongs to a network of 951 independent community-based programs that recruit, train and support citizen-volunteers to advocate for the best interests of abused and neglected children in courtrooms and communities.

CASA of Santa Cruz County currently serves over 270 children and youth annually - and the need doesn't go away.


  • Children Served

    270

  • Volunteer Hours

    22,900

  • In Kind Value

    $603000

  • Active Volunteers

    300

News & Events

Conny was just four years old when she was removed from her parents’ care and placed in her first foster home. Over the years, she was moved to seven different homes and ended up feeling unwanted and alone. It was difficult to trust anyone and she began to emotionally shut down. Click to read more.

Did you know that volunteers devote just 2-4 hours a week to showing up for a child or youth in foster care, and the impact they can have is life-changing?
Upcoming information meetings are:
Tuesday, December 11, from 10:00 to 11:00 a.m. at CASA, 813 Freedom Blvd. in Watsonville; OR
Tuesday, December 11, from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. at Live Oak Family Resource Center, located at 1740 17th Ave. in Santa Cruz
Sign up or view dates, times and locations of other information meetings HERE.

Read Dahlia's story

One of the most important steps for high school seniors is to complete their FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Even if they are not certain they are going to attend college, this is a great first step.
For a step-by-step guide to help your youth complete the FAFSA check out this link!/a>

Denise brings her years of experience as a teacher as well as all she has learned as a parent of a child with special needs. When she met Jose*, her current CASA child, she learned that he didn’t speak. He was four years old and clearly impacted by trauma. She knew that he understood language and was smart, and while the rest of his team of caregivers and social workers didn’t think he could attend preschool, she knew that with the right support, he would do well. Click to read more.


Watch Conny's Story